Like the website that hosts it, this blog is only concerned with using art and brief texts to uncover the bias and other limitations of thought conditioned by memory and tradition, thus also revealing how this largely unacknowledged tribal egotism that affects all human beings creates and sustains the systemic disorder and violence of the world in which we all live.

Without a radical awakening to the immense distance between our mental and social reality and the truth, we are condemned to continue living in the same cruel division, conflict, and sorrow to which we ourselves sustain with our personal memories, thoughts, and desires.

Keren Johns Wells' Memorial at Taughannock Park

About a month ago, Kate Burkett was kind enough to let Kim and I suggest the place where Keren’s memorial would take place. We took her to the North Point side of the park and then walked to the far end of it, a place between a meadow and a row of trees and just a few feet away from Keren’s beloved Cayuga Lake. Kate liked the place, and so that is where on the sunny morning of August 3, a good number of Keren’s friends and relatives congregated to honor her life and her life’s work.

As soon as I arrived to the chosen place the day of the ceremony, I dropped down to the shore and photographed one of my favorite trees, the one that would be dancing right behind us as quite a few of Keren’s favs spoke, laughed, and cried about her life and her many tangible and intangible gifts to all of us. It was a wonderful, joyous encounter, and a good ways to reflect about our particular lives, relationships, and deaths.

These images of her memorial are my small tribute to Keren and her closest friends; too bad she could not come, she would have enjoyed the place, the people, and their stories, children, and dogs.
If you would like a print of anyone of these images, please get in touch with me here.



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How Does One Face-Up to Humanity's Betrayal of Life - II

Close and Lively Encounters ― Photo Essay - 17